I’m joined by Amy Purser from The Social Networker.

Amy’s been working with social media and marketing for ten years, and watched her parents grow a mail order company into a successful multi-channel hobby business. This served as her apprenticeship and taught her a lot about running a business.

As I’ll explain in the episode, Amy and I met online and I invited her on the show, mostly to talk about how social media can be such a double-edged sword. On one hand it’s great because it helps with marketing and connects us with our audience. But at the same time, social media users are feeling more disconnected than ever.

Because Amy’s such fun, we spoke about all of that and more.

I think you’re going to really enjoy this episode, particularly Amy’s advice on how to create boundaries with that delicate work/life blend.

Before we dive in to this episode, you should know that Amy has a whole heap of marketing resources available on her blog. And, if you’re in the Midlands, you may well be interested in her Social Media Basics workshop that’s happening in Belper on 23 October 2019.

Okay, I’ve talked enough now – let’s hear from Amy.

More Amy-related things:
http://amypurser.com/
www.linkedin/in/amypurser
Demeternoth – Amy’s Twitch streaming profile

Social Media Basics workshop on October 23rd in Belper. Details can be found on Eventbrite

 

Show Notes

 

Victoria
Hello. So today I am joined by Amy. Hello, welcome to the show.

Amy
Hello, thank you for having me.

Victoria
Oh, you’re so welcome. Now when I first started this whole podcast idea, you were one of the first people that I wanted to get on the show. I know that you’ve had a lot of experience with social media in general because that’s what your background has been in, but I know that you’ve also had a few challenges with the whole working remotely thing, and I’d love to hear your thoughts on all of that as the show progresses. So for those of you who don’t know you, what do you do?

Amy
Well, I run two businesses. One is a marketing agency, that’s The Social Networker, and one is a domestic cleaning agency which is My Domestic Goddess, and both of those businesses I run primarily from the office that I’m talking to you from, and then I’ve just started a third kind of… It’s not an income stream yet, but it has potential to be that, and that’s through… This is really, really geeky. Through streaming video games. I’m a huge video game player, so there’s another avenue that way where I can basically leverage this little office space as much as possible to be income generating, so yeah.

Victoria
Whoa, we need to backtrack there, Amy. What is this? How can… What? Tell me all about it.

Amy
So I’m involved in computer games as a hobby, and have been on and off I suppose all my adult life. The one that I play the most and have done for 10 years is called World of Warcraft, so shout-out to my geek friends who know what that is. And there are a huge amount of people that run on… I mean, you can stream on YouTube, you can stream on one called Mixer. I use one called Twitch, which is twitch.tv, and I stream on there about three nights a week, and I play World of Warcraft, and I talk about what I’m doing, and I explain the story behind what I’m doing, because it’s as rich and developed a world…

It’s basically if you think of Game of Thrones translated into a game with dragons and witches and wizards, and Lord of the Rings thrown in, and some steampunk, and all that kind of stuff, but the story is as rich as Game of Thrones, and I absolutely love it, and that’s one of the key things that I talk about when I’m playing through this world. Yeah, and I’ve met some of my lifelong friends through it. I met my son’s father through it.

Victoria
Did you? No way.

Amy
Yeah. We’re not together now. It’s all good, it’s fine, but yeah. As an outcome from playing a computer game, there’s not many bigger than giving birth to another human being.

I think there are serious business applications around streaming and the software that you can use. Very similar to the software we’re using now, and there are things that you can do that I can help with my clients with marketing as well for video recording and production, and all that kind of stuff.

So it’s not just about me streaming video games, it’s also about, “Hang on a minute, I can use this technology in my marketing agency to help my clients,” and I think what we’ll see is… I mean, Facebook Live is a big thing. LinkedIn Live is coming as well. I know some people have already got that, but I don’t. I’m very cross about it.

Victoria
Come on LinkedIn. Get your bums into gear.

Amy
Exactly. But you can do streaming through these channels, and they have massive audiences. There are people who do it as a living, and that’s all they do. They don’t need to be employed. We’re obviously self-employed people so we probably have a different take on it to others, but it’s a phenomenal bit of kit that can be used for so many different things, so yeah.

Victoria
So it sounds like you’re able to monetise something that you’re doing anyway for pure enjoyment, and actually help your clients along the way. It’s like triple whammy win all round, isn’t it?

Amy
Absolutely, yeah.

Victoria
Amazing.

Amy
Yeah. So if you’re generating content, then, with The Social Networker, I like to work with people who have a story, and they’re very passionate about what they do. They’re very knowledgeable about what they do, but they might be struggling to get that message out.

Through the marketing experience that I’ve got, we then help them to streamline what they’re doing, and one of our sort of taglines is we join the dots.

So we get you doing it consistently. We get you doing it with adding all the value, and showcasing your knowledge and being authentic and all of that, and using things like Twitch, Mixer, YouTube Live, whatever it might be, you can do that. You can pull that content out, you can put it across all your other channels.

The recording software that I use is called OBS, which allows you to put in graphics, links, and to thank people when they’ve subscribed to you, when they’ve paid you some money, when they’ve donated. All that kind of stuff. So anybody who has content that they are putting out into the world anyway can use things like Twitch. And then there’s all sorts of other add-ons as well like Patreon, or Podio. I don’t quite know how you pronounce that one. But people can give you money for doing what you love.

Victoria
Wow.

Amy
So yeah.

Victoria
Seriously. Win win win.

Amy
Absolutely.

Victoria
No, amazing. I love it. I love that you’ve found something that you’re thoroughly… You’re doing anyway, but you’ve managed to kind of weave it into other aspects of your life and your business, and gained a son along the way. Hurrah!

Amy
Yeah, absolutely.

Victoria
So I guess with both the streaming and also what you’re doing on the social networking and marketing side, and maybe to some degree on the cleaning bit as well. I imagine you’re having to build trust and rapport and relationships with people who you haven’t met, or who are only relying on your voice, or only relying on your written communication in order to get to know you, your brand, and what it is that you stand for. How do you build trust with people in that way when you may not even meet them?

Amy
Some of the things that I teach when I do marketing training – there are a couple of extremes in marketing messages.

I use a dating analogy. So you’re the person that turns up on the first date, and within five minutes you’ve told this person your life story, what you want to call your children, where you want to live, and you’ve got down on one knee and given them the ring. You’ve proposed within five minutes on the first date.

And the other extreme is that you’re the person who says, “Oh, you look really nice today, and here’s some flowers. I thought you might like, and if you really want something, maybe you can… I’ll help you.” And you’re in the friend zone, and you never actually ask that person out.

Victoria
A peck on the cheek might be as much as you get, hey?

Amy
Yeah. So there is a happy place in the middle of that, and that’s where you build that trust, and that is where you do some selling, but you combine it with building yourself as an influencer in your network. Now everybody is like, “Oh, Instagram influencers. Oh yeah, we all want to be that.” You can be an influencer in your industry without having to be an Instagram Insta-famous influencer. All it is, is about showcasing your knowledge, helping people, and putting yourself in that position of authority. And all that is being on top of the latest trends in your industry, whatever that might be.

And you can either share somebody else’s content on it if they’re not a direct competitor, or you can reword it. It’s very quick and easy to rework something, to take the knowledge, rework it, and pass it out to your audience. That builds your authority and your brand. So along with influencing and selling, you have to do some selling.

Also, you build your networks, you talk to people, you share advice with people, and I think whatever industry you’re in, if you’re in business, then it’s a good idea to share general best business practice as well, because nobody now, doesn’t matter what industry you’re in, if you’re a business owner, you might have started in one area, but you are then running a business as well, and you have experience of that that you can help other people with, so that helps to build your network by sharing other people’s experiences that is relevant to your audience. Obviously this is networking. We met through online networks.

Victoria
We did.

Amy
And that’s a way of building your credibility as well, and building that trust.

Victoria
And we met over a mutual love of Rob Moore. Amy is now doing a heart-shape thing with her hands, in case you’re not watching the video.

Amy
Yes, we love Rob Moore. Big up. Yeah, and then the last one is listening. So if you’re listening to people, if you’re… Wherever your clients are, they’re going to be talking about your industry, your product. It might not be your direct product, but a similar product or a similar service, and if you’re listening to them, you can go back and tweak your product, adjust it. You can understand what they want from it.

Heaven forbid, if something terrible goes wrong then you’ve got an ear to the ground so you can understand what’s going wrong. But all of those things built into your marketing will help you build trust, and people will begin to know you. They always talk about know, like, trust. Not everybody is going to like you, but they can actually still trust you. You can still be a person who represents your industry very well and is knowledgeable without everybody having to like you.

Victoria
I’ve not thought of it like that before, actually. That’s a good point. Would they buy from you though, if they don’t like you?

Amy
Well, that’s a good question. I bet there are people out there who have bought from people that they don’t actually like, but they know and they trust them. Now it’s nice to have everybody like you, but it’s extremely draining to try and please everybody, so…

Victoria
Oh yeah, absolutely.

Amy
So you have to be consistent, you have to show up, you have to be consistent in your message and about who you’re trying to reach, and I think one of the other biggest things about building trust when you can’t actually meet these people all the time is if you screw up, you hold your hands up and you say, “I’m really sorry. I screwed up. Shouldn’t have done that, but we’re not going to do it again, this is what we’ve learned, this is the changes we’re putting in place,” and you’re open and honest about those sorts of things. Then in my experience, that massively builds trust. It just-

Victoria
Yeah. I’m a big fan of always proposing solutions rather than problems, so you’ll go, “Oh, this happened. This is what I’ve done to fix it, and this is the lesson that we learned so that we’re mitigating the risk of this ever happening going forward.” Bish bash bosh, everything’s sorted.

Amy
Yeah, and it’s in this… I mean, marketing especially can be so heavily automated. We’ve got messenger bots, we’ve got automatic emails, we’ve got scheduling across all of social media. Online marketing is very heavily automated, and actually you need to have a human face. If you’re in a massive corporation, if you have people who are the human face on your social media channels, those people will build trust in your brand. And if they’re saying, “Guys, really sorry we screwed up,” taking out that robot, if you like, of automation really helps people to connect and to build that trust.

And I think that also adds to authenticity which is a big thing, and I know a lot of people go, “Oh, I’m just being authentic. Oh, I’m just being this.” No. If you’re being authentic, you don’t actually have to tell anybody, because you’re just being you and not constantly having to justify it or to highlight fact that you’re being authentic.

If anybody says on a post, “I’m just being authentic,” I’m like, “Well, the rest of your posts are not then, are they?” As long as you say it, you’re not being authentic. And I think people who are, yeah, to me that just says, “Well why aren’t the rest of your posts authentic then?”

Victoria
Yeah.

Amy
You know-

Victoria
I think I read something ages ago, and it was something along the lines of, “Your posts online should reflect you as a person when somebody meets you in person.” So your written word can’t be so far removed from how you talk as an individual that when somebody meets you in person they think it’s, like, “Is this the same person?” So I think that what you’re saying, you have to have a level of authenticity, otherwise you’re going to come unstuck at some point, surely.

Amy
Absolutely, and fakes are very quickly found out, and it’s not nice for that person who has been faking it, because they will be found out very quickly, but they’re also… They’re misrepresenting themselves to such a level that I actually think it can make them quite ill. I think there is… As an ex-people-pleaser myself, when you’re trying to please everybody, all you end up doing is, first of all you make yourself ill because you’ve got no energy for yourself, but also nobody really knows who you are, because you haven’t stuck to one thing. And that can create mistrust, because people are like, “Well if you’re doing this, how can you be doing that?” And, “I don’t understand where this person goes.” So being consistent and showing up as yourself, as scary as it is, you’ve got to do it. And some people won’t like you, unfortunately.

Victoria
Now I’d love to dig into this whole people-pleasing thing a little bit more, because I know you and I have spoken before about social media being a little bit of a double-edged sword, and the reason I say this is because I came off social media toward the back end of 2018, because I was feeling the pressure. I wasn’t staying in my own lane, I felt like I had to get the posts out every day, they have to be perfectly worded, they have to gain a certain level of engagement and traction and all of that stuff, and I felt like I couldn’t live up to the expectation that I’d set to myself, and that I felt like I had to do I guess from a society perspective, and I think the only logical thing I could do at the time was withdraw from that people-pleasing, that external validation. So I’d love to pick your brains on what your experience of people-pleasing has been, and how maybe you battled with that, or what you did to overcome that, or what advice you can give to others who are chronic people-pleasers.

Amy
The first thing I would say is if you are a chronic people-pleaser is do some work around boundaries, and learn where your boundaries are. And it took me probably a good two, two and a half years first of all to figure out where my boundaries were. And this is quite a personal thing, but it’s important because if you don’t have them set in your personal… If you think of it as like, “This is my personal space. This is my family, friend space. This is the rest of the world.” If this one, if this one closest to you, your personal space and your personal boundaries are not strong enough, then everything out there just comes in. It all just comes in, and this is what happens on social media as well. So you’re so open to everything, because you have no boundaries. Everything floods in, and that’s when we get… Literally, it floods in and we get washed away.

So having those boundaries of self-care, of accepting that you have to say no. So the first thing is look after yourself and understand what that means to you. Now for some people, it’s… For me, it’s very easy. I need to get out in the fresh air, I need to stop work when my son comes home from school, and it might be that I do some more work in the evening when he’s in bed. That’s fine. It may be that I say, “No, actually I deserve time off as well.” So things like walking in nature. A lot of people do meditation. I’m quite sporadic with it, but I do enjoy it when I do it more consistently. Terrible on consistency for that one. Yoga.

Victoria
I can’t do meditation without falling asleep, so yeah. It’s great for falling asleep.

Amy
Yeah, and there are different things that work for different people. Yoga works really, really well for me, and because I breathe as I’m doing it, for me that’s more meditative, and it puts me back in my body. So for me, that’s a self-care thing of I have every other day get some stretching in, do a bit of yoga stretching, and that’s a boundary for me.

I know if I’m not doing those things I’m not taking self-care, and when you’ve taken that time to have your self-care, you then have the strength to say no, and saying no means that you’re going to upset some people. I could be more direct than that, but I’ll try not to swear, but… And the people that are upset are the people that you have to have the strongest boundaries with, because the reason they’re upset is you’re now not facilitating their needs.

They are coming to you because you’re facilitating some need for them, and you’re putting their need ahead of yours. So when you start doing self-care and you learn to say no, you’re taking care of yourself. You’re putting your needs ahead of theirs. So when we then extend that, and I guarantee that the people you will need to do that with are going to be some close family members to start with. It’s really hard.

Victoria
Oh really?

Amy
Yeah. It’s usually those family members. And some of them might be absolutely fine with it, because they’ll recognise that, “Oh, finally she’s taking care of herself.” I’ll say she because it’s my experience, but I’m sure it applies to men as well. “She’s taking care of herself and she’s doing what she needs to do. That’s brilliant.”

And then you go out into the wider world, and you get into these things of social media, and the fact that anybody can message you at any time night or day. Anybody can email you at any time night or day. That doesn’t mean you have to answer them straight away.

Victoria
Yeah, and I think that is such an important point, and I think one of the problems with social media notifications, so such as let’s say a client sends a message to you via, I don’t know, Facebook Messenger, or WhatsApp, or a text message, or some other medium than email or a task management system.

So my issue then is that I don’t have a way to process that incoming task, and also I receive communications through my friends and family in those other ways, so it then runs the risk of one, being lost because it’s kind of a I only look there if I need to do something for friends and family, or two, it’s more I’ve read it, and then I’ve moved on to something else because I’ve not been able to process it. And I think if there were different ways to process those messages, it might be easier to deal with that, but equally, by being unable to process them in that way, it means I have been able to set boundaries with clients to say, “If you would like me to do something, please send it over email or via our task management system.”

So streamlining it in that way means I know where to look and where, and also we’re really clear on the response times. Because like you’ve said, when you’re getting all the notifications in those different places, and also when people can see that you’ve read it, it’s like, “Pressure, now I have to respond straight away.”

Amy
Yeah. And what you’ve said there about telling clients, “If you want me to do something, you use these channels,” that, so many people don’t do that. I say to clients, “If you want to get hold of me in a hurry, ring me.”

Victoria

Yep.

Amy
Do not email. Do not text. Do not use Messenger or any other means. Ring me, because that is the only guaranteed way that I am going to know that whatever you need is urgent, because you’re ringing me. Everything else I manage. I decide when I do those tasks. I decide when I’m going to answer those calls. Those messages, sorry. So if you call me, I know that shit’s on fire and you need my help. But if it’s just something that you want me to fit into the rest of the work that we’re already doing, or you’ve spotted something that you want amended, or you’ve seen this great story that you want to talk about, any other channel that that comes in on, we will then filter it and put it into our systems, but if you don’t, if it’s not, if you want something urgently, they must call.

And you have to have that, because as you’ve just said, if we’re getting bombarded day and night by messages, some people still have… A lot of people I know now are better at it, but there are people out there who expect a response straight away, and that’s not how it works. If you don’t manage your time and your boundaries, somebody else is going to do it.

Victoria
But I think this comes back to what you said earlier as well about clients and family members where you’re setting boundaries, and I think people… You’re setting yourself up to fail to a certain degree by responding to people straight away, because you’re then conditioning them to believe that as soon as they send a message, they’re going to get an immediate response. So you’re actually doing yourself a massive favour by hitting pause and going, “No, I’m going to send this response later.”

And I love that Gmail has recently introduced that send later facility. So I used to have a different add-on. I think it was called Boomerang or something like that, where it was a little Chrome extension, and you could respond to an email as it came in, but not send it straight away. You could set the send for like, I don’t know, four o’clock in the afternoon or the next morning. So it meant that you could process it immediately, but the client wasn’t being conditioned into the fact that you would always respond within minutes or whatever.

So I think that’s so important to put those boundaries in place from the beginning if you can, and work out what’s important to you as an individual so that there isn’t suddenly this, “Amy, you keep on messaging me and I can’t cope with it all,” because I’ve never told you that before, so how would you know it was a problem in the first place?

Amy
And I think as entrepreneurs, we’re very… We’re driven. We want to get things done. We want things happening. But we’re also our own worst enemies, because unless we have those boundaries in place we’ll burn out.

Victoria
Yeah.

Amy
And then we won’t be able to do what we’re supposed to do, which is actually drive a business, because we’re too busy working in the business. So having those boundaries and accepting that between 09:00 and 17:00, family, you have to be very dedicated and very clear about where your times are as well, and maybe it’s 09:00 to 17:00, unless it’s an emergency, family have to wait and you deal with clients, and then after five o’clock… On one of my email footers for one of the businesses I have “family after five”. I say, “I will not respond to emails after five o’clock.”

Victoria
Yeah, I love that.

Amy
Now if I choose to do that outside of time, that’s up to me. But it’s to set clients’ expectations that I will not necessarily respond to you after five o’clock, and having those conditions and actually putting them in contracts . if you have to.

Victoria
I think just communicating them as well. It doesn’t need to be a big deal. So like you’ve put in your email footer, it’s that visual reminder every time they receive an email from you from that account, they have that little cue. “Oh, it’s after five. I know Amy’s not going to respond until tomorrow.” That’s fine. It’s been communicated. That’s all you need to do.

I actually implemented, I think I called it a fair use policy, earlier on in the year. So I sent it all the clients, and it just pretty much said, “Look, this is what you’re paying for, and this is what you get in return. I absolutely love what I do. These are my working hours. This is how I’m going to help you. If you need urgent, like pants-on-fire support after this time, this is how you contact me. Otherwise, I’m going to be back online the following working day.” Because at the end of the day, I set up this business because I wanted to create a role and have a career while working around my daughter’s school hours. So like you and your family after five, I’m doing this for my family. It’s not the other way round.

Amy
Yeah, and I think there’s a much bigger understanding of that than there ever used to be, and I think where we’re talking about social media as a double-edged sword, that’s one of the positive aspects of it is there are so many entrepreneurs working in a way that works for them, not in a way that works for a wider corporation or whatever, and social media is able to show that so many more people are aware that that is how we work now. It is not…

And I know that there are still plenty of jobs that are in 09:00 to 05:00, and if that is right for you then I have nothing against that. I know that now it is not right for me, and when I’m having, as entrepreneurs do, we have a pants day and we’re like, “Oh, god. I’m just going to go get a job.” But-

Victoria

Oh, do you have those days too? That makes me feel better.

Amy
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah, I have those. But then I’m like, the thing that pulls me back from the brink of going to Indeed and uploading my CV or whatever is I can’t do what I do now with the freedom that I have in the hours that I have, earn what I earn, and be there for my son.

Victoria
Yes.

Amy
I would have to go back to work Monday to Friday, 09:00 to 05:00, 05:30, whatever it was, and he’d be in breakfast club, after school club, I’d have a dog walker, I’d have this that and the other, and I’m not saying that that’s not a great life for people that want it. I just know I couldn’t do it now.

Victoria
Yeah, yeah.

Amy
And that’s a massive kind of… When you realise that, and you realise, “Oh crap, I’m on this rollercoaster for good. I’m not getting off.” It can be a bit of a shock, but that’s what so many of us in the self-employed environment… That’s what we do, and that’s why we do it. And social media, again, that double-edged sword thing. The beauty of it is that we are able to connect with so many like-minded people whether they’re local to us or around the world. And we’ve already talked about Rob Moore, but in Rob Moore’s communities there are people from all over the world, and they’re joining together to help each other in this entrepreneurial journey, and that is phenomenal.

The amount of support and the amount of people that you realise that have A, gone through the same thing, and B, survived it, that’s where I’m like, “Social media is amazing. This is why I love it. This is what it can really do in terms of helping people.” But if you don’t have that boundary, especially that personal space boundary to start with, you are just going to get washed away, and you have to structure that. I have taken time off from social media. I work in social media for my clients every day, and sometimes I’m just like, “I can’t do it anymore.” And I have times where I will take all the apps off my phone, and I do sort of pre-empt it by saying, “Right, I’m having a break. I’m taking everything off. If you want me, these are the ways you can contact me.” And you’d be surprised how much people can do on their own, and what they can discover on Google if you’re not at their beck and call.

You have to have those boundaries. You have to know to turn off notifications. Set boundaries with your clients. In Facebook Messenger, if you’re using the Messenger on your business page, you can have an auto-respond, and it can turn on when you’re not in the office, and it can send an automatic message so people understand that you’re not there.

It’s a bit harder in… I mean I’m an Apple user, and to turn out of office on Apple email is a pain in the backside, but you know.

Victoria
In Apple Mail, is that?

Amy
Yeah.
Email generally these days isn’t considered as urgent, is it?

Victoria
No.

Amy
It’s great for reference, it’s great for newsletters and things that you want to read later.

Victoria
Covering your arse.

Amy
Yeah, yeah. Exactly. “I put this in the email.”

Victoria
Yeah, exactly.

Amy
“Did you not read it? That is not my fault.”

Victoria
“As per my email on such and such a date.”

Amy
“Not kind regards, just regards.”

Victoria
I love that one. That’s my favourite passive aggressive sign-off.

Amy
“As per.” As in, “Did you not read it?”
And then, “Regards.” That’s as angry as we can get. Is it Very British Problems or something that talks about that.

Victoria
Yes. They’ve got like a sliding scale, haven’t they, of different salutations and sign-offs and everything. Yeah, I love it.

Image result for very british problems regards

Amy
But you know, all that kind of thing – we can control it. You are not obligated to be there 24/7, and using it as a… It’s a tool. Understanding that it is a tool, and if you use it correctly it will be helpful, and if you don’t, it will hurt you, like any other tool. When you’re training your kids to saw stuff with a junior hacksaw, if they use it right, it’s great. If they don’t, they’ll slice a finger off.

It’s exactly the same with social media. It’s a tool, and it’s very important that people understand you are not obligated to be there.

Because people think it’s free, then they should be there because it’s free, and they should spend all their marketing budget and all their time and energy on it. No. It’s only free up to a certain point, and obviously Facebook now is much more pay-to-play than any other platform and it’s still fantastic, but it’s not free because it costs your time. You have to dedicate time to it, and if you don’t have the time and it’s not an important marketing channel for you, don’t blooming use it.

The amount of people that say to me, “Oh, and I should be on this and I should be on that, and the latest shiny platform releases.” I’m like, “Hang on a minute. Is your client there? Is your audience there? Do you like using that platform, even?”

Victoria

Do you know what? That was going to be the one thing I would add there, as well. If you don’t like using it, don’t use it. Like, I don’t like Twitter, personally. I still have a presence there in the sense that I have a page, because it’s handy to have, particularly if you need to hound a certain software company to do something because they haven’t responded to a help request or a support ticket. But do I spend my marketing focus, time and energy there? No, I don’t.

My clients are on LinkedIn. That’s where I would rather spend the majority of my time, and I remember one contact asked me about Instagram. “Oh, what are you doing on Instagram? What are you doing with your business page?” All of that stuff. And I was like, “I’ve put my Instagram page to private. It’s got pictures of my family. I don’t want them out in the public. It’s just a way for me to be creative with some photography. I don’t want to feel like it’s yet another channel of social media, because to me, that would add to my internal overwhelm as well.

And again, it probably comes back to what you said earlier about people-pleasing. That person could easily have said, “Oh, what are you doing about Instagram?” And I could have gone, “Oh, I need to be on Instagram because they’ve said it.”

You know, and for me, I realise that having my Instagram profile as private, that’s part of my boundaries. I need that in order to maintain my mental well-being and good state of mind and all of that good stuff, because I feel like with social media moving at such a pace, it’s brilliant, like we’ve already said, for connecting people, but then you’re also reading all these reports about people feeling more isolated than ever and more alone than ever, and I think that’s something that we’re all struggling with to a certain degree, and one of the reasons I came off last year as well. Just because I just thought, “I can’t keep up. I need to step away. I need to have a bit of isolation and solitude just to get back in my own lane.”

But equally, I think when you are a remote worker, you can be quite reliant on it for the sense of community and the collaboration and all of that. So do you have any tips that you could share with people about how to use it well without kind of getting drawn into all of the vanity stats or comparison and all of that stuff as well, which don’t really mean anything overall?

Amy
No.

Victoria

It doesn’t buy you clients, does it?

Amy
No. So what I teach in our workshops is social media is only a part of marketing. It should not be the sole focus of your marketing activity, and the reason for that is that it works best when it is a supplement or part of a full marketing strategy. If it is your only marketing strategy, you are going to get really fed up with it, because you’re not going to see the results from it quickly enough.

And it’s a long-term game. It’s not a, “Oh, I’m going to post this and it will be viral.” That just isn’t how it works. So social media works best when it’s part of a bigger strategy, and it’s also you don’t have to be across every single platform. If you’re, like I said a moment again, shiny new, shiny new, shiny new, and so you’ve got Facebook, you’ve got Instagram, you’ve got Tumblr, you’ve got Twitch, you’ve got Twitter, you’ve got LinkedIn, and you’re going, “Oh, I’m going to go everywhere and I’m going to do everything,” and then none of them are consistent. None of them are adding value. None of them are building your brand or your voice, or you’re not reaching anybody, because you’re spread too thin.

So what I teach, and I teach it because I believe it, is do one, do it well. Get used to it. Then add in the second one. Get used to it. Do it well. Then add in the third one. Get used to it. Do it well. And actually, three or four is probably enough for most people. If you’re doing them well, they should… And by well, I mean consistently adding value authentically. You’re getting engagement. You’re getting people coming, driving people to your website or to your phone number or whatever it might be, and you know that it’s working, and you’re tracking your return on investment.

Victoria
Yes. Very important. Yeah.

Amy
Yeah. Then you can add another one in. And it might be that you start on, “I’ll use Facebook because ubiquitous and everybody knows what it is.” And it might be that you start on Facebook with a Facebook business page, and you know that your audience are there, but you also know that they’re on Twitter, so you have your brand page on Twitter. You don’t actively spend a lot of time there, but you’ve got it because you don’t want anyone else to have your brand name.

So you work on Facebook, you get that working really well, and it’s not necessarily automated, but you can do it like this now. It’s like you can do it quite quickly, quite easily. So then you can go and spend some time on Twitter. You know that your core market is there. You can reach them, and you spend some time building that while still maintaining your Facebook.

And then it might be that actually, everybody else is talking about Instagram, but your audience is on Reddit. So why would you go and spend time on Instagram? You need to choose the ones that are right for you and your business, and you might love Reddit, and you might find that it is brilliant, and it generates all your leads, and you might think, “Well, actually this is working better. I don’t need to worry about Facebook so much,” and you might wind that down and look at what else you can do that reaches people that are on Reddit.

So you might look more at that profile. Where else are these people? And I would say three or four platforms is probably enough for most people. For my business, we look LinkedIn. I’ve got my biggest audience on LinkedIn, so we haven’t been very consistent on that, and that’s something that we’re now working on. Facebook because it’s where everybody is. It’s not necessarily where my target market are right now, but I like it. I spend a lot of time there anyway.

So those are our top two. We have Instagram. We don’t really do anything on Instagram. We have Twitter. We don’t really do a lot on Twitter. But as I say… And we’re building the podcast and YouTube channels, because I do a lot of video content, so it makes sense to then put that out across those channels and into a podcast. So we’ve actually-

Victoria
You haven’t told us about the podcast. You need to tell us about this, because wow, what’s this? Tell me, tell me.

Amy
So the podcast is called The Social Networker. And I started it about 18 months, two years ago possibly, and then hadn’t been consistent. The thing that I always teach I hadn’t been doing.

Victoria

Well, you know, life.

Amy
Yeah. But we are now, largely because I’ve been inspired through doing the streaming and Twitch and OBS, I’m recording on OBS, we then put that into YouTube, we pull out the audio, we put it into a podcast.

Victoria
Re-purposing heaven, Amy. I love it.

Amy
Yeah, but it’s exactly what I love to do, and it’s very quick, very easy, and it’s there. So yeah, The Social Networker. Across all podcast channels. Yay. Whoop whoop. Whoop whoop.

Victoria
Is it out now already?

Amy
Yes, yes. So every Wednesday we launch a new one. They’re very quick. They’re usually anywhere between… I think the shortest one we’ve done might be like a minute and a half, but they can be very, very quick. They’re around 10 to 15 minutes on the longer ones, and we’ll be building it up to things like this, like interviewing and getting people on where we’re… And building the length of them as well. So a la Rob Moore.

Victoria
Yeah. Rob, can you come on both of our shows, please? We’ll love you forever. We’ll be supporters forever.

Amy
Whoop whoop. Yeah, so that’s where we’re now spending our time more is… And we know Facebook inside out. That’s fine. We get it going. LinkedIn, we’ve got a huge audience on LinkedIn and we haven’t really taken advantage of that, so that’s what we’re doing. And then because we’re doing things for those channels, it makes sense to put them on YouTube and on podcast, but also looking at alternatives to YouTube. So there’s other video platforms.

Victoria
Are there?

Amy
Yeah. So Vimeo, Dailymotion. Dailymotion I’m not too invested in at the moment. Vimeo is one that I’ve looked at before anyway. Yeah, so all these kinds of areas that we can put stuff out, so yeah.

Victoria
One of the reasons for me doing the podcast is because it almost forms the top of my marketing pyramid, so everything from this interview will be downloaded and re-purposed, and it will be classed as evergreen content, so there’s so much that you can do from this one interview, and if I think of it as just being only one hour of my time a week, that’s nothing to create maybe up to 50 different pieces of posts and content to re-purpose.

Amy
You’re like a golden client.

Victoria
I know.

Amy
Gold star. Gold star. Gold star.

Victoria
Yay. Thank you. But it just makes so much sense. And also, pro tip, interview people, because then you hardly have to do any of the talking. Somebody else does it all. It’s amazing. Awesome. Now if you weren’t doing The Social Networker and the streaming and director of the cleaning company, what would you be doing with your time? What would you love to be doing instead?

Amy
Well now you’ve just listed it all off, I’m like, ” think I’d probably like a rest.
Bit of a lie down. Yeah, some sleep, please. To be honest, in terms of the content generation and streaming, I think I’d still be doing those.

Victoria
Would you? Amazing.

Amy
In terms of content, I just love it. I absolutely love generating content, and ideally useful content that’s going to help people in their business in their marketing. The streaming is… I absolutely adore doing the streaming, and it’s under a different name, so don’t anybody listening or watching go and try and look me up under this name, because you won’t find me.

Victoria
Do you want finding? Do you want to give the name out?

Amy
Well, yeah, go on then.

Victoria
Go on, give us a name.

Amy
Yeah, okay. If people do want to find me, you can look for Demeternoth, which I’ll spell. It’s Demeter the Greek goddess. Demeternoth.

Victoria
Okay, we’ll add that to the show notes so people can find you should they wish to.

Amy
So as Demeternoth, I am on Twitch and Twitter, and there’s an Instagram account as well, but it’s a slightly different name, but anyway. Yeah, so I think if I wasn’t doing this I’d still be creating content. I’d still be doing, definitely doing the streaming. I’d probably have a bit more time to do things that I haven’t been able to do over the past few years, like horse riding a bit more. Ideally, my dream as a kid was always to own a horse racing stables. I think I’d still be doing those sorts of things, and just having as much fun as possible with as many people as want to be involved in whatever I’m doing, I think. So yeah.

Victoria
Awesome. Lovely. Well, Amy, it has been an absolute pleasure talking to you today. Thank you, so, so much for your time. I really do appreciate it.

Amy
You are very welcome. It’s been a true delight.

Victoria
Cool. Thank you so much.

So over the next few episodes, I’m going to be having some fantastic guests coming in to speak with me about all of the issues relating to building a remote working business and all of the tech issues and the tech challenges that building a team and building a trust along the way as well. So I hope you enjoy it. If you have any questions, drop me an email. It’s podcast@victoriatretis.co.uk.

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